A giant game of Tetris

It seems like we’re always moving something to move something else, to move something else.

When we were bringing items here from the old house, we stored some smaller furniture items and four wardrobe boxes of clothes inside the house-to-be-remodeled instead of in the storage tents. This was a double-edged sword. Things still got damp, just not as badly as the tent stuff. As we’re getting closer to ripping into walls inside the house, we have to move much of this into the barn. (…So we can move it back into the house later — this is getting tiresome!)

The clothes were easy, actually. At least a boxful went straight to Goodwill. (Some of these were examples of truly laughable fashion choices: why exactly did we keep them?!) Eventually, all the clothes will have to go back into the house and upstairs. I have no intention of carrying anything upstairs that I haven’t worn for a while(or looks that silly!) with the exception of some seasonal items.

We’ve kept a manageable amount for both of us on a small clothes rack inside the barn. It’s nice to have access to it all again: you get used to being able to select an item from your closet, which is generally wider than the 9-inch-wide space inside the trailer. I don’t want or need a walk-in closet, yet choosing from the same five things was getting boring.

I also discovered and moved a bunch of odd-sized knick-knacky things found inside the house, too. I had been looking for our flag all summer, and there it was, with Frank’s grandpa’s old skis, a hockey stick, and two wooden porch candles for Christmas. They make an unusual vignette in the barn now, waiting to be popped up in the loft with the suitcases and a lamp just sitting there in the way.

It seems like a decision has to be made every time we touch anything: do we move it, give it away, set it aside for trash, or keep it? Why is it even there? It does get old, yet apparently this was a muscle I needed to develop.

Taking something into the barn to keep it may not be the end of the issue, either. We have moved the washer back and forth in the same 10-foot area to be able to work stuff around it, and to move the excavator, and to move the truck, and to move the truck back in, and… you get the idea.

It’s the biggest game of Tetris ever. And no real end in sight.

The Great Furniture Miracle

ourtrailer1

We’ve had everything in storage tents on the property for months now, and we know that many of the items in boxes are completely ruined because of the rainy summer, fall, and now winter. The furniture was in a separate tent, which was the wrong tent when I bought it. I thought I was getting a little plastic garage-in-a box, where you insert Tab A into Slot B for a bunch of metal tubes, and then you cover the skeleton with a vinyl shell. I ended up with a party tent, with the same metal skeleton, but instead of a one-piece cover, the cover is several vinyl pieces that you can use in various configurations to just have a roof or have sides, too.

In other words, not sturdy. Especially when you get a foot of snow. Continue reading “The Great Furniture Miracle”

Sometimes the oddest things…

barn1

It’s funny what can make us happy sometimes. As our trailer odyssey progresses, we had hoped to have the house itself further along by now (and actually to have it habitable, if not finished). Along the line, we did the math and determined that we had enough money to build a pole barn instead and put the trailer inside. We would then heat the barn to 50-55ºF and give the Atwood furnace inside the trailer a break. Continue reading “Sometimes the oddest things…”

Where does all our stuff go?

clutter-2

I would be lucky if this photo depicted everything we own. Factor about 12 times this. Okay, maybe 112 times this.

A trailer does not lend itself to living large. Or living with lots of stuff. (It is not even designed to be lived-in for any length of time, but I am a rebel.) What I did not recognize early enough was that I was everyone’s repository for stuff — and what that fact would mean as time passed. Continue reading “Where does all our stuff go?”

“Then what’s your least favorite thing about living in a trailer?”

dislike

Ah, the “leasts”….  There aren’t as many of those as you might expect!

Okay, I can’t cook. Actually, I’m a very good cook — I just don’t have any desire to do so. (Maybe this belongs in the most-liked discussion — now I have an excuse!) We discovered that someone created and manufactured a metal cover for the stove burners, and it fits perfectly. Apparently, I wasn’t the first non-cook to live in a trailer. We put our toaster over on top of the burner cover, and the burners became useful. We use the tiny oven to store non-perishables, and we have jammed a chopstick behind the control knobs so they can’t be turned on without purpose.

We do one of the things that all the diet gurus say not to: we eat out. We then have leftovers, and that’s how we eat in the trailer. Besides the toaster oven, the trailer was equipped with a microwave, so that’s how we eat. Add a coffee maker, and I’m all set. No traditional cooking required. Continue reading ““Then what’s your least favorite thing about living in a trailer?””

“So what’s your most favorite thing about living in a trailer?”

heart shape multicolored stand

Hmmm….. My most favorite thing….

(I’m never good at these questions, like when the interviewer asks, “What are your three greatest strengths?” Argh — brain freeze!)

I could say it’s the challenge of the whole situation. “Let’s just change everything about everything and make everything else look seamless. Oh, wait, change that too?” It forces you to look at every single part of your life. Continue reading ““So what’s your most favorite thing about living in a trailer?””

The Definition of “Small”

cage3-e1542511607369.jpg

What (actually) does today’s title mean?

I have what feels like 16 square feet of floor space now, but more freedom than possibly ever before in my life.

We inherited my grandma’s house in the city several years ago and recently moved from it. The family had owned it for 72 years when we sold it. That’s a lot of history in two floors of 1200 square feet each. Continue reading “The Definition of “Small””

From the Incisors to the Trailer

 

Be careful what you wish for….

So much of this started last year, for a truly unusual reason: I wanted to straighten my teeth. This led to a 19-month roller coaster ride where everything in my life changed except my husband and dog!

There will be a key take-away here, and it’s that we are living in a 17-foot travel trailer.  And we like it. Continue reading “From the Incisors to the Trailer”