A giant game of Tetris

It seems like we’re always moving something to move something else, to move something else.

When we were bringing items here from the old house, we stored some smaller furniture items and four wardrobe boxes of clothes inside the house-to-be-remodeled instead of in the storage tents. This was a double-edged sword. Things still got damp, just not as badly as the tent stuff. As we’re getting closer to ripping into walls inside the house, we have to move much of this into the barn. (…So we can move it back into the house later — this is getting tiresome!)

The clothes were easy, actually. At least a boxful went straight to Goodwill. (Some of these were examples of truly laughable fashion choices: why exactly did we keep them?!) Eventually, all the clothes will have to go back into the house and upstairs. I have no intention of carrying anything upstairs that I haven’t worn for a while(or looks that silly!) with the exception of some seasonal items.

We’ve kept a manageable amount for both of us on a small clothes rack inside the barn. It’s nice to have access to it all again: you get used to being able to select an item from your closet, which is generally wider than the 9-inch-wide space inside the trailer. I don’t want or need a walk-in closet, yet choosing from the same five things was getting boring.

I also discovered and moved a bunch of odd-sized knick-knacky things found inside the house, too. I had been looking for our flag all summer, and there it was, with Frank’s grandpa’s old skis, a hockey stick, and two wooden porch candles for Christmas. They make an unusual vignette in the barn now, waiting to be popped up in the loft with the suitcases and a lamp just sitting there in the way.

It seems like a decision has to be made every time we touch anything: do we move it, give it away, set it aside for trash, or keep it? Why is it even there? It does get old, yet apparently this was a muscle I needed to develop.

Taking something into the barn to keep it may not be the end of the issue, either. We have moved the washer back and forth in the same 10-foot area to be able to work stuff around it, and to move the excavator, and to move the truck, and to move the truck back in, and… you get the idea.

It’s the biggest game of Tetris ever. And no real end in sight.